Weerd Attic

adventuretom:

Batman meets the Green Hornet by Alex Ross.

Fantastic!

adventuretom:

Batman meets the Green Hornet by Alex Ross.

Fantastic!

So, with “Adventures of Superman” cancelled, I am taking recommendations for a comic to which I can give my money.  Looking for an unironic, inspirational, angstless superhero representing the best qualities of us all, to whom one may aspire.  Must be against killing for killing’s sake and understand the enormous responsibility that comes with protecting humanity, inspiring all who see him or her.  Suggestions?

bbcamerica:

"Time to die."

Robots are the topic of the premiere of The Real History of Science Fiction, airing tonight, Saturday, April 19th, following the season premiere of Orphan Black.

Tune in tonight to hear Rutger Hauer speak about Blade Runner, replicants, and… tears in rain.

Always reblog Blade Runner.

(Source: brandyalexanders, via tonysimmons)

captaingalaga:

Patriots and billionaires duh

captaingalaga:

Patriots and billionaires duh

(via thebobbycrogan)

comicsalliance:

FAKE GEEK GUYS: A MESSAGE TO MEN ABOUT SEXUAL HARASSMENT
By Andy Khouri
“I think this woman is wrong about something on the Internet. Clearly my best course of action is to threaten her with rape.”
That’s crazy talk, right? So why does it happen all the time?
Honest question, dudes.
That women are harassed online is not news. That women in comics and the broader fandom cultures are harassed online is not news. That these women are routinely transmitted anonymous messages describing graphic sexual violence perpetrated upon them for transgressions as grave as not liking a thing… that is actually news to me, and it’s probably news to a lot of you guys reading this.
So what do we do about it?
This.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

FAKE GEEK GUYS: A MESSAGE TO MEN ABOUT SEXUAL HARASSMENT

By Andy Khouri

“I think this woman is wrong about something on the Internet. Clearly my best course of action is to threaten her with rape.”

That’s crazy talk, right? So why does it happen all the time?

Honest question, dudes.

That women are harassed online is not news. That women in comics and the broader fandom cultures are harassed online is not news. That these women are routinely transmitted anonymous messages describing graphic sexual violence perpetrated upon them for transgressions as grave as not liking a thing… that is actually news to me, and it’s probably news to a lot of you guys reading this.

So what do we do about it?

This.

READ MORE

(via outofthefridge)

bullit1987:

George Blanda, Oakland Raiders.  AFC Championship Game, 1971, versus the Baltimore Colts.

bullit1987:

George Blanda, Oakland Raiders.  AFC Championship Game, 1971, versus the Baltimore Colts.

(via commitmenttoexcellence)

monkeysmeanbusiness:

athinkingmanspufferfish:

No one takes Arrow less seriously than its star.

I <3 Stephen Amell.

I want to talk for a moment about why I love Arrow.  Please understand I am only six episodes into season 2, so the think I love might bite me in the ass, but if so, no spoilers please: let me be disappointed Nolan style by thinking I am getting one thing and actually not getting the right thing at all.

Spoilers if you’ve not finished S1.

S1 starts off, as I hear a lot of people complain, with Ollie as basically Nolan’s Batman-Lite, and a little meaner as in the methods of modern comics, he killed.  Pretty freely.  But I noticed as I watched, there was a contingent of characters who were genuinely concerned about his body count.  There were even specific counts and reminders made as Ollie set out to save his city by putting an Arrow in all those bad guys.

Here’s the thing (and the spoilers): at the end of season 1, he fails.  His methods don’t work and The Glades are leveled, and his best friend is killed.  There are consequences to all of it, and Ollie suffers them, and realizes he has to change his mission both in execution (pardon the pun) and objective.  Starling doesn’t need a vigilante killer, it needs a hero.

Ollie realizes what Nolan misses.  Heroes DO need to be a cut above.  It makes me wonder if the writers on this series are saying this intentionally, poking at the new DC trope the way old timers like me do.  

"Arrow" in its first season turns out to be a refutation of the modernization of superhero ethics.

I love that as much as I love Diggle and Felicity talking shit to Ollie.

(Source: queen-smoak, via thebobbycrogan)

entconfessions:

[I found it odd that Malcolm Reed didn’t really seem to have any career or family/relationship ambitions, and had a rather boyish and care-free outlook despite being one of the older crew members.]

I wrote a whole fanfic about that.

entconfessions:

[I found it odd that Malcolm Reed didn’t really seem to have any career or family/relationship ambitions, and had a rather boyish and care-free outlook despite being one of the older crew members.]

I wrote a whole fanfic about that.

wishiwasmorticia:

weerd1:

Romulan women are not like Vulcan females. We are not dedicated to pure logic and the sterility of non-emotion.

Ah yes, the time Starfleet decided the best way to figure out the Romulan Cloaking Device was to have a Vulcan seduce a woman while their best officer pretends to be insane, fakes his death, and steals the device.  Was this plan ‘A’?

Actually, I ship that….

You know…and this is striking me as I should be writing something else and am sipping coffee, so very nascent thought here: The only think we ‘know’ canonically about Saavik is that there’s a mentor relationship with Spock, and her name isn’t very Vulcan.  Yeah, I know there’s all the stuff in the draft of the script and various novels, but nothing on screen.

What if she’s the Commander’s daughter?  Once the Commander allowed the Federation—and Spock in particular—to con her out of the Cloaking Device, she would have been shamed in that TOS honor based Romulan society and lost all status if not outright killed.  Maybe she has a ten year old daughter she wants to keep out of all of this, but any contact she would have in the Empire would turn their back on her and her House.  So she goes to the one responsible.  She contacts Spock.  Spock meanwhile does feel very conflicted about his role, and HIS sense of honor compels him to act.  Imagine the story of Spock, perhaps just as the Enterprise’s five year mission ends, sneaking across the Neutral Zone to “rescue” Saavik and bring her to Vulcan.  He earns her trust in the harrowing adventure on the way back, but he also realizes that his time among Humans in Starfleet has subverted his Vulcan side, and is responsible for this mess in the first place.    Upon return, he places Saavik with his parents, resigns Starfleet, and enters the Kolinahr discipline.  

When he fails and returns to Starfleet, Saavik trusts him, but sees the Fleet as a chance to not solely be a Vulcan, as much as she knows she can never return to her homeworld.  Her peers always wonder why the Vulcan seems to simmer with breathy “Damns” all the time, but never suspect she is Romulan aristocracy in exile.  

(Source: evilkirkseyeliner)

Romulan women are not like Vulcan females. We are not dedicated to pure logic and the sterility of non-emotion.

Ah yes, the time Starfleet decided the best way to figure out the Romulan Cloaking Device was to have a Vulcan seduce a woman while their best officer pretends to be insane, fakes his death, and steals the device.  Was this plan ‘A’?

(Source: evilkirkseyeliner, via themirrortribble)

Wow Herb.  Just yikes.

Wow Herb.  Just yikes.

wordsofdiana:


mishacollinsthighs:






I love Bond.  I really like HP.  But DW and SH are better than both of them.
The complaint should consist only of two words: Fucking Shakespeare?

wordsofdiana:

mishacollinsthighs:

image

I love Bond.  I really like HP.  But DW and SH are better than both of them.

The complaint should consist only of two words: Fucking Shakespeare?

(Source: unironicallygallifreyan)

Irving Klaw Presents: Joyful Dance by Betty

I am a huge fan of Bettie Page, and the real 1950’s America she represents that our parents almost pulled off hiding from us with stuff like “Happy Days” while shoveling behavior we hadn’t dreamed of under the rug.  Bettie with the right photographer (cough-Bunny Yeager-Cough) was simply stunning: Bettie in motion is mesmerizing.  

(Source: driedmoat, via juliabadoolia)